Navigate Progress!Pathways to SuccessBackground to the FrameworkWhat the Numbers Tell UsReporting ProgressNext! Where Are We Going?

Student Engagement

 

buttonseEngaged students have a sense of belonging in their school. They try hard to learn and want to participate in school activities. Here's what students have told us about their school experience:

Student Engagement

  • Students in grades 7 and 10 say that what they are learning at school is useful. An increasing percentage of students between 2009 and 2013 agree that their school work is interesting and that they are proud of their school. This suggests more student engagement. However, students in Grade 10 tend to be less engaged than those in Grade 7.
  • Students who aren't engaged in learning are far more likely to drop out of school. But, if identified early these students can be supported to complete high school.
  • There are a number of projects underway to promote more student engagement.

Advancing Adolescent Reading Initiative

Advancing Adolescent Reading Initiative
Loading the player...

The Advancing Adolescent Reading Initiative (AARI) is a comprehensive professional development program, developed in partnership with the JP Das Centre at the University of Alberta and Alberta Education. It is specifically for Alberta educators teaching in grades 7-12.

The students in the Cohort One pilot group completed their eight-module course of study and celebrated their graduation from the program in June 2013. The students in the Cohort Two pilot group will complete their studies in June 2014. Feedback from AARI participants reinforces the benefits of sustained and focused professional development in enhancing teacher practice and increasing student engagement and achievement.

For more information, contact Dana.Antaya-Moore@gov.ab.ca

Engaging all Learners

Engaging all Learners
Loading the player...

What does high quality teaching and learning mean in high school?
How can intellectual engagement increase student success and achievement?

Engaging Learners in Forest Lawn High School is a partnership initiative between Alberta Education, Calgary Board of Education (CBE) Area III leadership, Forest Lawn High School (FLHS) administrators, and Galileo Educational Network staff. Galileo's role in the partnership is to collaboratively create and examine the practices that sponsor increased student performance and engagement in secondary schools, with the end result being a better future for FLHS students and teachers. Data to inform this work came from a variety of sources, including TELL them FROM me.

For more information, contact Mary.Michailides@gov.ab.ca

Visit the Engaging all Learners web page

The High School Flexibility Enhancement Project

High School Flexibility Enhancement Project
Loading the player...

The High School Flexibility Enhancement Project worked with students, parents and staff in 16 Alberta schools to develop a new approach to education, one that does not equate time with school credits.

Freed from the time requirement, participating schools opened their classes to redesign and innovation. Removing rigid timelines opened up a possibility of personalized learning - focusing on the individual as opposed to the standard. It meant greater opportunity to explore passions, to be successful and to want to be in school.

The 16 schools involved in the flexibility project met as a group to share ideas, discuss solutions to common issues and challenges, and learn about the approaches in redesign being implemented in other schools.

In September 2013, phase 2 of this work, Moving Forward with High School Redesign, will begin, with more than 90 schools participating in the initiative.

Click on the video above to hear more about Alberta's High School Flexibility Enhancement Project.

For more information, contact Pam.Halverson@gov.ab.ca.

Visit the High School Flexibility Enhancement Project web page.

 

Learning for the 21st Century
Loading the player...

Learning for the 21st Century

The Learning for the 21st Century project was piloted in the Fort Vermilion School Division No. 52 with grades 6 to 8 students at Upper Hay River School, Spirit of the North Community School and High Level Public School. As part of the project, teachers learned how Web 2.0 technology could be used in their classrooms, and how it could be used to connect with the world beyond the school.

By introducing technology in grades 6 to 8, before students often decide to drop out, Fort Vermilion School Division staff believed that students would be more engaged and that high school completion rates would improve. District administration and staff involved in this project wanted to know if the use of interactive tools, like wikis, kidblogs and discussion boards, would provide more authentic learning experiences for all students, particularly First Nations, Métis and Inuit students. They also wanted to know if these tools would help students to communicate better and learn more, and if the use of these tools would, in fact, result in increased student engagement and improved high school completion rates.

The project:

  • used technology to support inquiry-based learning and different learning styles;
  • provided intensive professional development for teachers, linking technology to pedagogy;
  • opened opportunities for parents to become more involved in their children's learning - wireless technology will be introduced to their communities as part of the project.

For more information, contact Nathan.Freed@gov.ab.ca.

Visit the Learning for the 21st Century web page.

Return to top of page